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If is has been with you for more than 6 months but the symptoms have disappeared completely then before taking medication, it is better to see a doctor for testing. It could be that you had acute hepatitis b and your body's immune system has fought it and won. In this case, you do not need any medication at all. We strongly suggest that you see a doctor for test to confirm that the disease is gone.

Below are the general medication for chronic hepatitis b. Do not take this medication until it is certain that you are at the chronic stage of hepatitis B. The drugs are quite expensive because they are new and not very common. Your best bet is that you might get some in very big pharmacy shops.

Approved Drugs for Adults

The future looks bright for individuals living with chronic hepatitis B. Only a decade ago there were no treatment options. Although there is still no complete cure for hepatitis B, there are 7 approved drugs for adults (2 for children) and many promising new drugs in development. Current treatments seem to be most effective in those who show signs of active liver disease

Not every person with chronic hepatitis B needs to be on medication. You should talk to your doctor about whether you are a good candidate for drug therapy or a clinical trial. Be sure that you understand the pros and cons of each treatment option.

Whether you decide to start treatment or not, it is very important to be seen by a liver specialist or doctor knowledgeable about hepatitis B on a regular basis.

Approved Hepatitis B Drugs throughout the world

Interferon Alpha (Intron A) is given by injection several times a week for six months to a year, or sometimes longer. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms, depression, and headaches. Approved 1991 and available for both children and adults.

Pegylated Interferon (Pegasys) is given by injection once a week usually for six months to a year. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms and depression. Approved May 2005 and available only for adults.

Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, Zeffix, or Heptodin) is a pill that is taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved 1998 and available for both children and adults. 

Adefovir Dipivoxil (Hepsera) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved September 2002 for adults. Pediatric clinical trials are in progress. 

Entecavir (Baraclude) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved April 2005 for adults. Pediatric clinical trials are in progress. 

Telbivudine (Tyzeka, Sebivo) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved October 2006 for adults. 

Tenofovir (Viread) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved August 2008 for adults. 

Although the FDA has approved these seven drugs for chronic hepatitis B, they do not provide a complete cure, except in rare cases (a "cure" generally means that a person loses the hepatitis B virus and develops protective surface antibodies).

The drugs, however, significantly decrease the risk of liver damage from the hepatitis B virus by slowing down or stopping the virus from reproducing. As with HIV, it appears that combination therapy will probably be the most effective method of combating chronic hepatitis B infections.

There are no clear guidelines to recommend which agent to use first in treating chronic hepatitis B. Interferon is given for a defined period of time and may have a more prolonged response after the medication is discontinued than NAs. However, interferon is given as an injection, and side effects often are troublesome. NAs are given as a pill and have few side effects, but the duration of treatment is unclear, and prolonged therapy may be required. NAs may be preferred in patients with unstable disease and cirrhosis because they are thought to be less likely to cause serious flares of hepatitis with more severe liver disease.

like i said above, please see doctor because there is a strong possibility that you no longer have hepatitis b so all the drugs above are not really needed

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