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I need a durg which can be use to prevent pregnant which is 100% sure

asked in Health

1 Answer

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It’s easy to be confused by all the birth control options out there: Should you take a progestin-only pill or the mainstream combination pill? Can an IUD affect your chances of having children in the future? Is the female condom as effective as its male counterpart?

Luckily, we have answers. Here are 5 of the most common birth control methods, and why you should or shouldn’t try them.


Combination pill

What it's called: Estrostep Fe, LoEstrin 1/20, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo, Yasmin, Yaz

What it does: This birth control mainstay is still 99% effective against pregnancy when taken around the same time every day. It's also known for easing hot flashes and restoring regular periods.

Who should avoid it: Smokers and those 35 or older. The estrogen may cause dangerous blood clots. If you suffer from migraines, you should also pass because it may trigger the painful headaches.

Progestin-only pill

What it's called: Micronor, Nora-BE, Nor-QD, Ovrette

What it does: Known as the mini pill, progestin-only meds don't contain estrogen. They're safer for smokers, diabetics, and heart disease patients, as well as those at risk for blood clots. They also won't reduce the milk supply for women who are breast-feeding.

Who should avoid it: If you have trouble remembering to take your pill at the same time every day, progestin-only pills might not be your best bet. They need to be taken at exactly the same time every day; if you're more than three hours late, plan on using a backup method.

Extended-cycle pill

What it's called: Lybrel, Seasonale, Seasonique

What it does: These pills prevent pregnancy and allow you to have a period only every three months. (Note: Lybrel stops your period for a year, but you must take a pill every day, year-round.)

Who should avoid it: There's no evidence proving it's dangerous not to have periods, but there is still no long-term research to show that it is safe.

What it's called: NuvaRing

What it does: The ring is made of flexible plastic and delivers estrogen and progestin, just like the combination pill. You place the ring in your vagina for three weeks, and then remove it for one week so that you have a regular period.

Who should avoid it: Women who smoke, or have blood clots or certain cancers, should not use the NuvaRing.

Patch

What it's called: Ortho Evra

What it does: You can place the hormone-releasing patch on your arm, buttock, or abdomen, and rest easy for one week.

Who should avoid it: If you're particularly at risk for blood clots, you might want to find a different method. The patch delivers 60% more estrogen than a low-dose pill, so you're at an increased risk for dangerous blood clots.

Implant

What it's called: Implanon, Norplant

What it does: About the size of a matchstick, the implant is placed under the skin on your upper arm. Implants last for three years and can cost up to $800. They are nearly 100% effective.

Who should avoid it: Implanon may not work as well for women taking St. John's wort, or women who are overweight.
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